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EF Assistant Thread: Thanks for all of your comments so far! The official title of the service I’m looking for is Executive Functioning Assistant. Since most people don’t know what Executive Functioning is, and many people don’t possess adequate executive functioning in the first place, finding assistance for this is more difficult than you think.

I have had a lot of assistants over the years. Some didn’t know they were executive functioning assistants, but they were superb.

he problem with answer your question is that I formulate thoughts by acquiring thousands of data points and then seeing the pattern. I’m spewing points on this thread to that end.

You can draw real parallels between hgih-functioning autistics and the deaf culture. Here is an excellent video explaining: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=93RxomTzcws

Substitute “social hearing” for “auditory hearing.” This comparison becomes even more real when you take into account my sensory processing disorder–sound.

After watching this video, if you want to see Autistic Culture, go to Comic-Con. The smaller ones are better, or the nooks and crannies of the big ones, because corporations which make money from media tend to dilute it.
Not that this is wrong, but it does dilute the culture.

Remember, I am writing this dialog to acquire and share data points to problem solve.

Remember, I am writing this dialog to acquire and share data points to problem solve.

One of my strong points, and the reason people like my writing, is that I have trained myself to mirror other people, empathize with them, try to get into their heads. The disadvantage of this is I can fake it so well that people start to believe it’s the real me. Actors have this problem.
I will even start to mimic your accent, nod vigorously at your opinions. Fit in.

But who does the same for me? I notice that the best assistants and mentors have autistic family themselves. They grew up learning this autistic way of thinking. They are bilingual. Just like family members of deaf kids learn to sign. But how many of you are willing to communicate in Autie?

I highly recommend the movie Arrival. It’s theme is vital to understanding this–Your language affects how you perceive the world. Autistics have a different language.

Therefore we perceive the world differently.

One point the above video makes is that Deaf people are visual people. Well, autistic people are visual people. Temple Grandin, the patron saint of autistics, indicated tha ther fMRI looked like she had a video card in her brain.

This means that language is my second language. Keep that in mind. I have to practice language every day. In fact, I try to write 1000 words every day so my brain doesn’t revert to visual and thus diminish my communcation skils with neurotypicals (meaning most of you.)

For autistics, our work and interests are a piece of us. That’s why Rosalyn Helps excelled–not only does she have autistic family members, but she graduated in Editing. Other assistants/mentors have interests in 3D, VR, sound and music–which are also interests of mine.

So one qualification is that the ideal candidate would have expertise in a creative area. This of course drives up their pay scale,, oh well.

I have found one essential qualification to be really rare–familiarity with accounting and business management. My goal is to be an independent contractor who makes money with my works, and so I attract artists. I need a bean counter who can set up accounts and marketing/fulfillment MY way. Even more rare. For example, you should be proficient in GnuCash. The bookkeeper I worked with was willing to accommodate. Much appreciated.

A difference between deaf culture and autistic culture is the facial recognition. According to that video, deaf people focus on the face, and feel uncomfortable texting. I have learned from my autistic grandson that autistics commuinicate with their entire bodies. You have to watch everything.

The Deaf community doesn’t want to be “cured.” Guess what? The Autism community doesn’t want to be “cured”, either. We don’t want to be “fixed.” Wrap your head around that one for a while.